USF Book Club: The Invention of Hugo Cabret

Hello! USF Book Club continues its procession of books about kids who have lost their fathers with The Invention of Hugo Cabret by Brian Selznick.

We will meet on March 16, 2012 from 12-1 pm in room 314 of Gleeson Library (note the different room — up on the third floor).

How to get the book: Request it through Link+ or get it at SF Public. Unfortunately it is not available in e-format.

Interested in Book Club? Check out our wiki page or email kbaughmanmcdowell@usfca.edu to sign up for the mailing list.

About The Invention of Hugo Cabret:

Here is a true masterpiece—an artful blending of narrative, illustration and cinematic technique, for a story as tantalizing as it is touching.Twelve-year-old orphan Hugo lives in the walls of a Paris train station at the turn of the 20th century, where he tends to the clocks and filches what he needs to survive. Hugo’s recently deceased father, a clockmaker, worked in a museum where he discovered an automaton: a human-like figure seated at a desk, pen in hand, as if ready to deliver a message. After his father showed Hugo the robot, the boy became just as obsessed with getting the automaton to function as his father had been, and the man gave his son one of the notebooks he used to record the automaton’s inner workings. The plot grows as intricate as the robot’s gears and mechanisms […] To Selznick’s credit, the coincidences all feel carefully orchestrated; epiphany after epiphany occurs before the book comes to its sumptuous, glorious end. Selznick hints at the toymaker’s hidden identity […] through impressive use of meticulous charcoal drawings that grow or shrink against black backdrops, in pages-long sequences. They display the same item in increasingly tight focus or pan across scenes the way a camera might. The plot ultimately has much to do with the history of the movies, and Selznick’s genius lies in his expert use of such a visual style to spotlight the role of this highly visual media. A standout achievement.

-Publisher’s Weekly

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